What Contribution Does Onshore Wind Energy Make?
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What Contribution Does Onshore Wind Energy Make?

By Energy CIO Insights | Monday, November 23, 2020

Wind energy has a comparatively, small carbon footprint. Some greenhouse gas emissions are created by the production, transportation, and setting up of wind turbines, but these are considered relatively low, at around nine gCO2/KWh.

FREMONT, CA: Wind turbines harness the energy of moving air to produce electricity. The onshore wind signifies turbines located on land, while offshore turbines are positioned at sea or freshwater. Onshore wind plays a chief role in the generation of renewable electricity in many parts of the world.

Chief Advantages of Onshore Wind Energy

Wind energy has a comparatively, small carbon footprint. Some greenhouse gas emissions are created by the production, transportation, and setting up of wind turbines, but these are considered relatively low, at around nine gCO2/KWh. By contrast, gas power generators' average footprint is about 450 gCO2/KWh, and coal power generators are around 1,050 gCO2/KWh.

 

Researchers from a university found that wind power in the U.K. barred the creation of nearly 36 million tonnes of emissions from sources like coal and gas between 2008 and 2014 alone, the equivalent of taking 2.3 mill

ion cars off the road. New onshore wind was recognized in 2015 as being fully cost-competitive with coal and gas in some parts of the world and the low-priced source of power generation in the 

U.K. for the first time. This competitiveness was facilitated by cheaper technology and lower finance expenses, as coal and gas became more expensive.

Disadvantages of Onshore Wind Energy

Onshore wind is an intermittent energy source, as turbines cannot produce electricity on demand, but only when the wind is blowing and at adequate strength. When wind strength is scarce for turbines to operate, a fossil-fuel-based power supply is required as a backup, which can provisionally increase greenhouse gas emissions. Onshore wind turbines have also been criticized for their visual impact. Turbines are characteristically more spread out than other large-scale energy infrastructure projects and can affect a larger area. Another criticism is that turbines may impact species like birds and bats.

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