Onshore and Offshore Drilling: What Sets Them Apart
energycioinsights

Onshore and Offshore Drilling: What Sets Them Apart

By Energy CIO Insights | Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Offshore drilling is performed in a distant position across the water from the shore. Operators drill as far as 12,000 feet below the earth's seabed.

FREMONT, CA: Oil drilling requires cutting into the foundations of the earth's crust to access the deposits of hydrocarbons. Drilling takes place onshore under the subsoil of the earth and offshore below the seabed of the earth.

Drilling Onshore

Onshore drilling is conducted on the ground, not on the water. The rigs are shifted by ground transport, and several times multiple wells are drilled from the same location in very close proximity to each other by gradually shifting the rig. Onshore drilling profiles differ from:

Shallow to deep wells

Extended distance to ultra-extended reach wells.

Vertical to deviated wells.

Offshore drilling

Offshore drilling is performed in a distant position across the water from the shore. Operators drill as far as 12,000 feet below the earth's seabed. These wells are drilled using thin steel pipes and other attached tools to allow a drill sting. Each pipe is approximately 30 feet long, and more pipes are connected to the drill sting as the well is drilled deeper.

Drilling Defense

Oil rig workers face a variety of threats every day. Knowing how to take special measures to avert an injury is incredibly necessary. Dangers oil rig worker face includes:

Fire–The staff work every day around extremely flammable chemicals. They still face the challenge of a well built up with so much friction that could lead to an explosion if it is not fixed in time.

Falls and Falling Objects–Oil rig employees work on elevated platforms, posing a danger of falling from high heights, are at risk of tripping objects, and are often at risk of teammates dropping told and other objects on them.

Harmful Equipment Accident–Devices such as drills, rotating machines, and service units such as cranes and forklifts are very noisy and find it impossible for employees to interact with each other while they are disabled or at risk of harm. In reality, staff may be crushed by moving equipment or electrocuted.

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