How Is Biomass Used To Generate Electricity?
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How Is Biomass Used To Generate Electricity?

By Energy CIO Insights | Tuesday, June 09, 2020

As sustainability and the climate crisis heats up, biomass is an underrated renewable energy source that is helping power homes and businesses organizations.

FREMONT, CA: Biomass is an organic matter, like wood or plant materials used for power generation, in industry and is an alternative source of heating. Biomass is used in the same way as coal but with extremely lower when associated with carbon emissions. Biomass is obtained from various feedstocks, including agricultural or forestry residues, dedicated energy crops or waste products like uneaten food.

The type of biomass used by Drax company is high-density, compressed wood pellets. The sources of pellets are from responsibly managed working forests in the US, Canada, Europe, and Brazil. They made up of low graded wood produced as a by-product of the production and processing of higher value reliable wood products.

Top 10 Biomass Solution Companies in Europe - 2020Biomass producers and users must meet a range of valid measures for their biomass to be certified as a sustainable and responsibly sourced. The robust measures like monitoring and reporting, biomass is a cleaner and viable option than fossil fuels.

Biomass uses renewable energy in the form of steam used to drive massive turbines, in turn, generate enough electricity to power entire cities. It works similarly to how other thermal fuels such as coal and gas generate power, but crucially with significantly lower carbon emissions.

Over the last ten years or so, renewable energy sources that depend on weather conditions such as wind and solar power have increased, helping to green up the grid and reduce the carbon intensity of the UK's energy network.

However, the increase has also introduced new challenges for power system stability. As biomass is a power source that can be regulated when needed, it helps to present balance to the grid and meet energy demand when the sun isn't shining wind isn't blowing.

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